You're too stupid for VDI

Of course no one actually comes out and says that directly, but when people say that VDI is more complex than traditional desktops and thus should be avoided, isn't that just a nice way of saying that you're too stupid to use VDI? Then there are those who are saying that PCs are too complex, and therefore we need VDI to relieve us from that complexity?

Of course no one actually comes out and says that directly, but when people say that VDI is more complex than traditional desktops and thus should be avoided, isn't that just a nice way of saying that you're too stupid to use VDI? 

Then there are those who are saying that PCs are too complex, and therefore we need VDI to relieve us from that complexity? So for them it's not that we're too stupid for VDI -- it's that we're too stupid not to use VDI. (Microsoft's messaging versus VMware's I guess? :) So thank you for saving me from my own stupidity!

But where along the way did we become scared of complexity? Where did we actually think we had a chance of removing complexity from our environment? Yeah, VDI is complex. But so is Windows. And desktop management. And storage. And security. And the registry. And DLLs. And profiles. And printing. Yeah, pretty much all this stuff is complex. So why do we embrace the complexity of 95% of what we do while running scared from the complexity of VDI or desktop management?

There are lots of reasons to do desktop virtualization and VDI. And there are lots of reasons NOT to do desktop virtualization and VDI. But not doing VDI because it's complex is not one of them. Neither is doing VDI because desktops are complex.

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I generally find complexity to be default and anything that can improve on that to be a bonus :)


Of course if your "thin on the ground" in terms of staff then the more simple the management infrastructure the better.


People (generally management) often assume complexity = expense and therefor try to avoid it.... 


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I agree with @daniel and @brian that complexity is inherent in any sufficiently advanced system - whether it be VDI or how they price Superbowl Commercials - and while your GUT tells you both are a really good idea to do - getting into the nitty gritty of the details can be a daunting task.


Some do it, some don't - tools emerge to make the task(s) easier - the conversation progresses, etc. I think this is where we are in the Hype Cycle - the slope of enlightenment.


However, when i think of both (in my example) - what it really is about it SCALE - and how to get it to work FOR you and not AGAINST you. One : One relationships are old school, more complex, and expensive.


What i mean is i want to do something once, and have it effect as many people as possible.


-configure


-test


-change


-secure


-backup


-roll out / roll back


-choose vendors, images, etc.


-patch, manage, etc etc etc


If we had the elusive single super golden master uber image that would be ideal. But that is hard. People do different stuff in our orgs. So, we get as close as we can, and then figure out ways to manage the deltas. Sound Familiar? I think this is what we have all been doing for 20 years. OS, patch, backup, app delivery, security, change control, etc - took us 20 years, but we got the complexity / scale to work FOR US.


My thoughts on "VDI complexity" - its what we call it when we are hesitant to do the hard work. The good news, i see more and more people willing to do that now, daily.  Do the heavy lifting, get the data, do the math, make your choices - and see how the end result more quickly gets scale working for you vs. against you. If that is not what you found, you did it wrong.


On a side note: What is the greatest SUPERBOWL COMMERCIAL of all time ???


My vote: " Wasssssupppp ??" Frogs from Budweiser.


T.Rex


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IMO it's not being "scared" of complexity, it's having the mentality of "doing less but accomplishing more".


It is evident that the birth and evolution of IT follows this mentality.


The programmer analyst side of me sees a lot of resemlance with Software Development and Desktop Virtualization. Trying to keep the code base as small and generic as possible and permitting as much code sharing that can be allowed to eliminate unnecessary redundancies. Better for management, scalability, performance, and security.


All things in life have a minimal form, just shave off the fat while not losing the function.


"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."


- Albert Einstein


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Brian, when reading this article... I was reminded of some of the comments you made during the Virtual Bridges VERDE day of Geek Week 2010... remarking on their use of the command line... with lots of flags.  I don't think you are too stupid for the command line, but you seem to think you are. :)


There are several approaches to reducing complexity but a very popular method these days seems to be to limiting product features and making more decisions for the user... which I'm not very fond of.


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VDI is like a onion, lots of layers and like the onion hard to digest with out some effort.


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For client computing, where so many systems come together, complexity is bound to be high. The trick is to ensure that complexity does not grow hugely over time through duplication of systems.


For me that means making sure that infrastructure systems get used over multiple technology cycles - avoiding islands of complexity that will become a problem as we inevitably move forward and today’s new-and-wizzy becomes legacy.


Martin Ingram


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The stupidity lies in the status quo assuming their users won't figure out how to and demand better ways to leverage technology. Lazy overly conservative IT people that hide behind constraints and focus on self preservation hold things up much like politicians debating tax cuts and health care.


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