The iPad could make 'Armageddon' a reality at NASA

As iPad use in the enterprise grows, it's good to look at some novel use use cases that really unlock the device's potential.

As iPad use in the enterprise grows, it's good to look at some novel use use cases that really unlock the device's potential. And it doesn't get much more novel than underwater PowerPoint presentations.

NASA has an underwater laboratory 62 feet below sea level, where it sends astronauts to train for potentially landing on and exploring an asteroid. (No word if the astronauts are all former oil diggers or if they're training to nuke any planet-destroying asteroids.) This summer, the agency used the SlideShark iPad app to help train the astronauts at the underwater research lab, which offers a low-gravity, space-like environment -- without the fear of space dementia. The astronauts, who don't want to miss a thing, were able to receive the most up-to-date training information on their iPads, which could help NASA meet President Barack Obama's goal of exploring an asteroid by 2025.

A lot of companies say they support iPads, but really all they do is allow the devices to access email. How is that any different than what BlackBerry did for all those years? As I've said before, email access is not why the iPad is special. The iPad is special because it lets businesses rethink the entire way they operate, from communicating to collaborating to training, and from the office to employees' homes to underwater labs to -- maybe one day -- an asteroid.

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