Provision Networks / Quest Software scores big time: Jeff Pitsch and Patrick Rouse hired!

Independent Citrix and Terminal Server experts Jeff Pitsch and Patrick Rouse have both joined Citrix competitor Provision Networks / Quest Software as employees.

2008 is opening with some big news. Independent Citrix and Terminal Server experts Jeff Pitsch and Patrick Rouse have both joined Citrix competitor Provision Networks / Quest Software as employees.

Provision Networks' main product is Virtual Access Suite which competes with several of Citrix's products (mainly Citrix Presentation Server). I've always thought that Provision's products were really cool, except they were not very popular because a lot of people didn't feel comfortable buying a product from a small relatively-unknown vendor, regardless of how cool the product was. This has been the case for awhile, with Provision just sort of quietly cranking out their products year after year in obscurity.

That all changed a few months ago when Quest Software, a $500M company, bought Provision Networks. At that time I speculated that this could really give Provision the shot in the arm they needed to catapult them into the mainstream. (What do you think? Check out the 51 reader comments from that November 2007 article.)

Provision has made really cool and innovative products for years. Now as part of Quest the have the financial backing to really give Citrix a run for their money. The only missing piece is a few evangelists in the industry to help spread the word.

Enter Jeff and Patrick. Both of them are Provision Networks VIPs (Provision's technical recognition program), so they're both obviously fans of Provision's products. They're also both Microsoft Terminal Server MVPs. And finally, Jeff and Patrick were also both Citrix CTPs, although as of January 1 they've stepped down from that position as it would obviously be a conflict of interest. (Brad Nunn, the admistrator of the CTP program, doesn't return back from his holiday vacation until Monday. Tough way to start the new year!)

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Photos: Jeff Pitsch on the left presenting at BriForum 2006 Washington DC. Patrick Rouse on the right presenting at BriForum Europe 2006. Photo credits: Pete Duvall

So congratulations to Jeff and Patrick! This is a fantastic opportunity for them to help shape the future Quest products and to really shake up the industry. And congratulations to Provision Networks and Quest Software. This is exactly what they need to do to help get the word out about their products.

The bottom line is that Provision Networks offers compelling competition to several of Citrix's products. Whether you like Provision or not, or whether you would ever use anything other than Citrix or not, I think everyone can agree that competition for Citrix is definitely not a bad thing. It will keep everyone on their toes.

Happy 2008!

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These two are geniuses; I believe provision network/quest couldn't have made a better move since both of them are highly visible on our industry with impeccable reputation and have extreme expertise on these products.I guess Citrix has lost two of their top evangelist; Maybe Citrix should hire some of their CTPs before they are taken as well,... just a little morning joke!
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The CTPs I know would not want to work for Citrix...
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Most of them already did... Doug, Gus and Rick D worked for Citrix in the past.
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This comes as quite a surprise to me.  Well, best of luck to Jeff and Patrick and to Quest/Provision.  I hope the New Year is prosperous for all.
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It's about time someone stepped up to give Citrix some competition.  I think Quest can do it.

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I've never seen any of the products from Provision Networks, I'm gonna check them out. I do agree with Brian that Citrix can use some competition.
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My point exactly!  Worked being the key term...
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Ditto!  Best of luck to Jeff and Patrick.
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I completely agree that Citrix could use some competition to wake them up, but Quest Software couldn't ride this one home even if they mounted Man o' War.

Quest has made a living of marketing software that amounts to your kitchen's junk draw.  They don't have the first clue as to how to drive something into the upper right quadrant nor will their corporate culture grasp it.  The company is full of great talent, but their leadership operates in the dark ages.  But hey, at least you can wear shorts to work there and that makes it all good.

Honestly, I hope this is the acquisition that turns things around at Quest.  Good luck.

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It is amazing how Qwest can aquire good software, keep it the same and then charge 5 times what it was selling fro before the take over. So I would guess since Quest owns them, pricing will go thru the roof, maybe even cost more than Citrix.....
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So now we have a guest brain on the citrix support site.  Jeff will have to assume a pseudonym and offer advice with subliminal messages. :)

http://support.citrix.com/forums/thread.jspa?forumID=75&threadID=94242&messageID=652984&#652984

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Congratulations Jeff and Patrick! Hope you guys are going to keep visiting this site - we need you on the forums! Best of luck with the new jobs.
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Funny thing is I just visited Patrick's site (http://www.sessioncomputing.com/) to see if he's already written anything about this, and there was an Ericom banner on it :-)
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Congrats to them! In my opinion, it doesn't really matter whether it's Quest Software or Citrix who wins the current market share. They are not bound to make it past 2012 anyway. Microsoft will release a comparable competing product by then. You can rest assured... Look at the trend they have been following over the last few server releases of Windows. Do you see the Terminal Services component evolving? The evolution is right there. You can't miss it. 

 

On the other hand, you have the evolution of the Internet. You have seen how web-based applications are evolving. The next generation of internet access and speeds is coming up in the next 3 years or so. Who is not to say that server-based computing will be replaced by web-based applications? This sounded crazy a few years back.. but not anymore. I predict that web technologies will achieve the same level of performance as your standard C-language-based application by 2015 or so, if not sooner. Of course, this is going to happen a few years from now but it will happen. There is no stopping it. Also, the advantages of this approach are enormous... No license costs for accessing the application - that is no license cost for the medium to access the applicattion, multi-platform support wihout porting source code. You write code once then work from anywhere on any platform. Centralized management, centralized data, centralized everything...

 

Ok, my opinion being stated, I think that it is a good thing that Quest software has a competing product against Citrix. This is a good thing. Now, I don't think that Quest software is prepared to offer tough competition in this area, at least not for another 2 or 3 years. In the meantime, a lot can change. Like I said, we are in for lots of surprises after 2010. 

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I heard the Mainframe was going away because of the PC.........

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And I know of a lot more Brilliant industry engineers that have started working at Citrix than have left. Most

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oops hit Enter too soon.... Most just don't care for the spotlight or don't have time to post 5,000 posts a week......
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Good observation but not an entirely accurate analogy. Whoever said the mainframe was going away because of the PC back then was not really clear on what the PC was compared to the mainframe. The fact is that both PCs and mainframes server two completely different purposes. For example, a PC runs the software you use to make orbital calculations with while the mainframe runs the Vogayer spacecraft which had gone past the orbit of Pluto. Most people would think that speed would be the major difference here. That's not the case. It turns out that modern PCs are many times just as fast as mainframes, sometimes faster. The key advantage of mainframes is the quality of the hardware, the fault tolerance, the meantime between failures of components, etc. You can add hardware on the fly - add/remove memory and CPUs, update kernels, update firmware - all without ever turning them off or disrupting the applications they run. Also, mainframes are designed to handle very large amounts of data.

Will supercomputers replace mainframes some day? Well, maybe. Maybe not. It's simple a matter of how advanced our technology is and how cheap it is to produce a supercomputer vs. producing a mainframe. It's really all about the money and practicality. 

While I currently have no opinion about this topic, I do agree that web technologies are great and they offer countless advantages over any other technology. We will definitely see more and better performing web applications in the future. Heck, it's even happening now. Our company uses three main applications to run the business. Two out of the three mission citrical applications, their vendors announced that for the next version due out in 2008 Q2, they are going to be purely web-based applications. They are offering a non web-based client for a surcharge and with little support. All their efforts are now going to the web versions. And these are huge applications from huge vendors. So it is already happening. 

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My point was that the main reason that the Mainframe is still around is it still does the job that is needed and most companies do not have the time or want to invest in recoding their applications that work just fine today. The same will happen with Win32 applications and "Fat Client" applications. Most Web Applications are still just Bait and Switch Fat Client Applications with iexplore.exe as their front end. A "Web Application" shouldn't require a 32-100MB Download to run. Which most LoB "Web Apps" do........
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Wow,  to say that Citrix/Quest will not be around in a few years because of web applications is a little short-sighted.

Legacy apps will still be around for many years to come.  Just drop by a hospital one day and see how many 16-bit applications they still have in production?  What are the chances those apps will be web-based in 4 years.

Many companies have tried and failed to go Web Based (Cerner for example).  And many of the applications that are web based (Peoplesoft, kronos, etc) run like crap on a local lan let alone via a VPN connections.

I'm not sure if you've been following what Citrix has done over the last 18 months or seen a road map of the next 12 but you should have noticed that Citrix has branched out into Application Delivery which includeds Web Applications as well as Desktop Delivery.

If we do feed into the theory of all web based apps,  then Citrix has that market covered too.  You've got Netscalers, AAC, CAGs, Wanscaler, Password Manager (for all those credentials the web applications have to keep), Provisioning server (great for large WEB farms too), XenServer, XenDesktop and Edgesight.

Even for a moment that a large company somehow manages to migration all their apps to web-based applications,  how will they deliver those applications to end users?  Internally it's a no brainer, but what about a remote user? a home user? a Kiosk?  a Mac? Mobile device?  What about browser support?  We all know Microsoft doesn't play fair in this arena?  Is everyone at home suppose to follow the corporate migration to IE 7?  What about those who use Opera, Firefox, Safari? Oh, wait, IE 5.5 because they are still running Windows 98.  An easy supportable solution is Citrix!  So now we are right back were we started with Seamless apps and/or Virtual Desktops (DDI/Presentation Server).  Then there are remote call center users.  Do you think end users will let the company install big brother/spyware applications on their personal PCs?  Oh, also forgot... What about those different web apps that require different and sometime conflicting versions of Java or Flash?

As far as Citrix licensing costs goes,  it's negligible.  It's a small piece of an overall larger budget.  The LOB, MRP, ERP, EMR, whatever licenses typically costs more than the access infrastructure hardware, licenses and services combined.  If your not use Citrix or Quest,  you'll still pay to licenses for your VPN and Load-balancers.  It's been a really long time since I've had someone complain about licensing costs on a sales call.  Most, if not all, like features of AE, PS Enterprise and more so Platinum.

Granted, there are million and one things I think Citrix SHOULD be doing (from a technical, marketing and end-user perspective) but I have to give them a lot credit,  they've done a remarkable job over the last 12 months.   I got the chance to speak with a few of the CTPs at iForum and from what I understand the CTP member have made huge inroads with Citrix at all levels.  Perhaps Brian can write something up? Success and failures?

Anyways,  somewhere along the lines this thread got jacked and turned into a Citrix and Quest bashing forum and it should be about Jeff and Patrick.  So in turn, Congratulations! and good luck!  Both of these guys will be successful in whatever endavor they choose.

Joe 

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It would be intersting to know why they went to Quest? Was it the money?  Was it the challenge?, Did Jeff Pitsch Consulting not do as well as he thought?.
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Web applications are the future of apps. Your argument is sound but you are failing to see the advances in connectivity. By 2015, as the previous poster indicates, web technologies would have changed. Hardware will allow download speeds well beyond current DS3 44.7 for the home user. Bandwidth consumed by these apps would be completely negligible at these speeds.

Then there is wireless technology which will easily reach the 1 GBit range by 2015. Delivery of applications will not be a concern. 

I guess we will have to see what happens. I think that application delivery via the next generation of Web will be a dominating market in application delivery in the next decade. There is no doubt about that.

Ok, going back to the main topic here, I would like to wish Jeff and Patrick the best of luck. I have no doubt they will excel greatly.  

 

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You missed the point,  it's not about the bandwidth.  It's about Support, Administration, Security, Compliance and Control.  You can also add scalability and end user experience into that mix as well.
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I can't speak for Jeff, but there were a few reasons I made the decision to work for Quest.  I have a good relationship with Peter and Paul Ghostine, and had considered going to work for them in 2006.  Now that Provision Networks is a Division of Quest Software, we'll have a lot more resources to develop and market Virtual Access Suite.  I did not join Quest because my consulting business was not doing well, or because I had any grudge against Citrix.  On the contrary, my consulting business was going very well, and I have (up until now) had a great relationship with Citrix.  I made the switch because I saw an opportunity to help mold VAS, without the worry that it wouldn't survive, now that it has the financial backing of Quest. 

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All of those easily handled with the next generation of web technologies. You guys are thinking now, your minds are set on the now. Think futuristically. Future web technologies cannot be compared to what we have now. It's like comparing a car from the 1920s to a car today with GPS Navigation, MP3 players, automatic pilot, self-correcting tires, etc, etc. Remember computer technology grows at a rate that is almost exponential.

I am not implying that we won't have apps anymore. Far from it. We will have apps for a very long time. But these apps will become legacy more and more as they give way to web-based applications. Only time will tell... 

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The guy that has been insulting people on this board for years by calling them "anonymous cowards"?  Yeah, I'll be sure to stay away from Quest now, knowing that jerk works there.
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Since all these advances are coming in connectivity, you should sit in your house and not do anything until then!  :)
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Who sounds like the jerk now?  Calm down.
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Thanks for answering that sounds like you thought about this alot and I personally hope you do well there.
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I think we all need to respect each other. C'mon, we are all professionals. Every opinion counts. We should not take anything that is said here personally and we should definitely not disrespect anybody. That's not what this site is about. I personally enjoy coming to this forum and reading about the technologies we work with on a daily basis. I think it's great that sites like these exist that allow us to share our ideas and help one another. That's all that really matters - help one another and share our ideas. Sometimes, we get so caught up in our own ideas and opinions that we forget that we don't have all the answers. Every opinion counts. For example, when I commented about web applications above, I was happy to read Joe Shonk's opinion above. He has a different perspective from mine but that doesn't mean it is incorrect. It's just a different idea. Who knows... maybe what he says is what is going to happen in the future of application delivery. Or maybe I am right and it will mainly be web-based applications. My point is that no answer is wrong or right. There is no way to accurately predict what is going to happen a few years from now. Do you guys remember the fever about the space program? How we were going to have humans of Mars by the late 1980's? How we would have colonies on Mars by the year 2000? See what I mean? One thing is to speculate and another thing is to have the truth in one's hands. There are so many different turns and possibilities that it is practically impossible to say what's going to  happen 5 years from now, not to mention 10 years from now.
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isn't it? I think these guys are solid and wish them the best of luck. Yes, technology is a rough sector...high risk & high reward. No one, not even MS can predict the future. Who would've thought Apple would be such a great company decades after MS beat the crap out of them? I know, an old, long boring story, but you get the idea...
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Actually business was doing great.  It was a very difficult decision to make.  A lot of it, for me, was being able to get into the VDI and to work with different virtual infrastructures like VMWare and what not.  As well, I think the opportunity to get into an SE role is really what convinced me.  I've been doing straight up technical work for 13 years now and I really wanted a change of pace.  And as Patrick said, with Quest buying PN, it really seems like a great opportunity to take advantage of.
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One little response is all I'm going to give.  Yes I have said that to people that throw insults at people while staying behind the Guest account.  I'm pretty sure that if they had to login and give their real names they sure wouldn't be so quick to insult people.  And typically when I have commented on it, the insults were completely uncalled for and were just down right nasty.
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I would think that the right time to join a start-up is before it gets aquired not after
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Dude! Really? You calling Jeff a jerk just proves the theory that you are hiding behind your guest title. I would love to see you posting this using your real name... tsc tsc tsc.
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I am sure you both got a big salary, signing bonus with stock. Nothing wrong with that.

You will be wanting to leave within 2 years. It is frustrating to work for the underdog. It is a big upstream battle which will take its toll as you feel like a 2nd class citizen. MS/Citrix has a giant hold on the SBC market. Provision/Quest may gain 5-10% market share given 2 years. MS has the total market share as usual with TS whether you use Citrix or whatever. Citrix may lose 15-25% of their market share when Windows 2008 and the new TS comes out.

Whatever you do - keep your prices at half of what Citrix charges. Do not force your customer to buy bundled software. Each package should stand or fall on its own merits. I do wish you well. Competition is good for all of us. Your opportunity will be on Win2008 in which you should have a giant marketing campaign.

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Let me jump in here......the crazy thing is that Jeff was getting mad while defending Citrix and the shortcomings of the Citrix product/company/decisions. Now he jumps to Citrix competitor while being a Citrix VIP? Perhaps he saw the (green) light. :)

These blogs are good for learning different perspectives from different people. Everyone may have a valid perspective - right or wrong from your vantage point.  

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I talked a bit with Jeff about his maybe job change a wihle ago. Since he has his own company and would give that up. But hey this is a great change for those guys to get the tools they like more in the spotlight.

PS: all those who post under guest account I don't like that either :) register and show your name it is so easy....

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Whatever happens, I would like to congratulate them. All that really matters is that they will be working with the latest and greatest technology. Ultimately, that is all the counts.

It's all Microsoft, my friends. Take a look at Terminal Services over the last few releases of Windows and see that the product has evolved greatly - both the client and server components. I predict, just as another poster did above, that Microsoft will gain a bigger market share of application delivery with Windows 2008. Let me clarify something. Microsoft already has all the market share anyway because the Terminal Services platform is the foundation on which all these SBC products sit on including Citrix and Provision Networks/Quest. What I mean is that with Windows 2008, they will gain a larger chunk of the SBC market solely with their Terminal Services platform (without Citrix or Quest, for example). That means that if I want to deploy an application delivery environment, I can consider using Windows 2008 alone without other add-ons such as Presentation Server. Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services is a big improvement over Windows 2003 Terminal Services and a great improvement when compared to Windows 2000 Terminal Services. At this rate, the next generation of Microsoft Terminal Services products are more than likely to be better and better, leaving less room for other competitors. In 2 or 3 years, Microsoft will gain a huge market share of the SBC world, meaning exclusively Microsoft and no other add-ons. Does that mean that Citrix and Quest will be dead in this market? Not at all. I think they can sucessfully focus on other areas such as virtualization and web-based application delivery as well as single sign-on solutions, to name a few. 

Therefore, unless a huge and unexpected turnaround occurs and Microsoft Terminal Services products turn out to be terrible performers, I think we can safely assume that Microsoft will dominate this area in a time frame of 2 to 4 years. It's so easy for them to do this, really. They own the source code for the Terminal Services core and they own the source code for the entire OS on which Terminal Services runs, including the kernel. The possibilities for them are endless. Having these in their control, they can do things that both Citrix and Quest can only dream of.

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". . .I think we can safely assume that Microsoft will dominate this area in a time frame of 2 to 4 years."

Welcome to the forums, Leonardo.  A little history lesson. . .people have been saying the above since 1996 about Citrix in the SBC market.  Guess what?!?  It's 2008.  Every time Microsoft releases a new server version, people like you, analysts and the press write the quote above. 

It's companies like Citrix, Provision Networks, etc. that add value to Terminal Services that really makes it production ready (unless you are a 20 person shop).

The same holds true for virtualization.  Companies like VMware have redefined what virtualization is and Microsoft is playing catch-up.  Will Microsoft dominate this area in 2-4 years because they are building portions of it into their operating system?  I don't think so.  It's much more than a browser!

Microsoft is a great company, has very smart employees but is also very slow moving.  This allows much more agile companies to get a head start and stay ahead as long as they have the engineering expertise and sales expertise to remain on the cutting edge.

Companies like Citrix have proven to do this, as I said, since 1996. 

 

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Microsoft is interested in growing the SBC market, not pushing everybody else out. I agree that the percentage of "pure" Microsoft TS installations will grow, but I believe the total number of installations of all the players will grow as well.

I've written a short piece on my blog to help you determine if Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services is good enough for you or if you need more: http://ericomguy.blogspot.com/2007/12/are-windows-server-2008-terminal.html

I've also written another item where I explain why Microsoft is not out to capture the market from Ericom / Citrix / Quest: http://ericomguy.blogspot.com/search?q=don%27t+get+it

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". . .I think we can safely assume that Microsoft will dominate this area in a time frame of 2 to 4 years."

Thank you. I am familiar with this history and you are right, of course. Now, Microsoft is showing an interest now that they have not shown in the past. The Terminal Services product is evolving. It's only going to get better and better. They will get some things wrong at first but they will correct them later. The percentage of pure Terminal Services environments will grown in the next 2 - 3 years. And it will continue to grow more and more. Citrix and competitors know about this. That's the main reason Citrix is focusing on other areas on which Microsoft is further behind.

I have been working with Citrix since the early days and obviously with Microsoft as well and I had never said that before. However, now it applies. Now they have acquired a deeper interest than before.  

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I am not sure how Microsoft "have acquired a deeper interest than before.".  Could you elaborate?

Their core engineering efforts around Terminal Services has stayed the same.  The team has not grown.  They have a relatively new program manager on TS that came from Sun.  Their core commitment seems pretty much in line where it has been.  They even chose not to go forward with "Bear Paw" and keep that functionality for Windows Server 2008.

Where they seem to be showing deeper interest to me is around virtualization.  Anything and everything to go against VMware they are pushing forward.  The fact that their beta around virtualization and the hypervisor came out early shows their interest and commitment to make a stand in this area.

I would say they are looking to partners to grow the TS market for them.  Sure, they have more features in Windows Server 2008 but those features equate to the MetaFrame 1.8, XP product line.  For many companies, that will be fine and it gives the opportunity for more companies to try TS.  But as more companies try TS and become hooked on it, they find out they need more features to make it truly functional for them.  As I stated before, this gives true partners like Provision Networks and Citrix the oppotunity to build functionality on top of TS and expand the market even more so.

Microsoft will take more market share, however, you will see companies like Citrix and Provision Networks continue to grow in this space since they need the "base" Microsoft to grow as well for them to succeed!

Why do you think companies like Citrix pushed so hard to have Terminal Services built into the core server operating system rather than a stand alone version like NT 4.0 Terminal Services Edition?  Because, this allows every customer who buys Windows Server as a potential customer for them without them having to buy something else on a server OS side!

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Contrary to what you may think, Provision Networks Virtual Access Suite is NOT an underdog in the VDI space, as "our" (now that's different) solution is hands-down more complete than any other "broker" on the market.  It just so happens that for < 1/3 the price of a CPS Enterprise License you get all of the TS and VDI features that are all managed from one console, that actually works the way one would expect.

I went to work for Provision Networks because I have a great relationship with the Peter and Paul Ghostine (founders of Provision Networks), and hold them in high regard. I can say with complete honesty that there is no way I would have left my consulting to go to work for any other application delivery company.  If anyone ins interested in what we are doing, feel free to contact me at  MyFirstName.MyLastName@quest.com.  My current territory is the Western United States and Canada, but I'd be happy to talk to any of you, regardless of your location.

This should be an exciting year.

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These guys have always been a great asset to the independent TS community, so while I think this move is great for them personally for us this is a loss.  I do want to caution them from continuing to tout themselves as independent.   After  Patrick’s most recent posting How to install and configure Provision Networks Virtual Access Suite (VAS) Enterprise Edition (Part 1)  his bio at the end still reads “Patrick is an independent server based computing consultant in San Diego, California. He is the author of www.sessioncomputing.com and has been working with Windows Terminal Services since 2000.”  Maybe this was an oversight, but this needs to be fixed.  Anytime that someone is posting information about a product made by the company they they work for, they need to disclose this.  Although they are certainly industry experts, Patrick or Jeff are no longer “independent”
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Will VMWare just buy them out if they make enough progress.....

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Accroding to this "connection Boker Shootout" Provision Networks certainly offers the most advanced solution.

http://www.freewysemonkeys.com/site/modules.php?name=News&new_topic=8

 

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When I submitted this article I was told that it would not be posted for a few weeks, so I thought I still had time to update my profile before it went live. I'm proud to be working for Quest, and my profile and website will be updated ASAP.  Perhaps I'm wrong, but I think I've earned the benefit of the doubt.
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Being an SE, regardless of what company, is a great thing. I look forward to seeing you guys in the field more!!
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I don't think that's a realy possibility in the near future, as Quest is not a small company and has 3000+ employees.  In addition to all of the other management tools that Quest has that do AD and Exchange Migrations, AD Management... they also own VizionCore which has products like ESX Ranger and a whole line of VMware tools and Invirtus which has VM packaging, optimization and portability solutions...

I love this technology and feel like the guy that is taking his tricked out Corvette to a show to display for all the gearheads to go "ooh, aah".  I'd be more than happy to give anyone who's interested the short or long tour of what Virtual Access Suite does.

 

Patrick RouseMicrosoft MVP - Terminal ServerSales Engineer, Western USA & CanadaQuest Software, Provision Networks Division(619) 994-5507 mobilehttp://www.provisionnetworks.com 
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