Citrix Executives answer your Questions

A few weeks ago, I posted an article asking you to submit questions that you would like me to ask Citrix executives while I was at Citrix iForum Global 2004.

A few weeks ago, I posted an article asking you to submit questions that you would like me to ask Citrix executives while I was at Citrix iForum Global 2004. I was able to get answers to most of the questions you posted, either from the sessions or in interviews I had with various Citrix executives. The answers posted here are not specific answers from a certain person per se, but rather an aggregation (since I asked the same questions to several people over the course of the event).

Will Citrix ever lower the cost of MetaFrame? What about creating a lower priced “lite” version of MetaFrame Presentation Server?
In every case, Citrix folks answered this question from the perspective of market segments. They said that you can segment your market by size or by vertical, but that the way that people support their users transcends company size.

Citrix must understand how customers view architecture. Any offering in the small and medium space must be a turnkey, simple, wizard-driven product.

Citrix can learn from their channel here. How does the channel support this space? Citrix will make products that fit into that model.

When will we see a 64-bit version of MetaFrame Presentation Server?
In the breakout session about “Citrix Futures,” the presenter said that we could expect a 64-bit version of MetaFrame in the “R2” timeframe, which Microsoft is scheduling for late 2005.

In interviews with the Citrix product managers, they reminded me that the feature set for the Extended Technologies version of 64-bit Windows is not yet complete, and we have to see if the “core” features that will be beneficial to Terminal Server uses will make it into the final release.

How is Citrix’s Microsoft relationship?
Citrix spent a lot of time at this year’s show talking about their Microsoft relationship. Microsoft’s Terminal Server Product Manager (Mike Schutz) was there, and one of the breakout sessions was a panel discussion that covered this topic.

Most of the discussion was “Rah rah!” drunken love marketing noise, but there were a few good points.

As for background information, 88% of Citrix’s current customers use Win32-based client devices. Also, Microsoft gets about USD $287 million in incremental revenue thanks to Citrix. This means that the relationship is very important to both companies.

The core message was that there is no reason for Microsoft to compete with Citrix. Since Microsoft still gets their full revenue (Server and Terminal Server CALs) when Citrix is sold, Citrix is actually helping Microsoft, and Microsoft would be crazy to try to take that away from Citrix. Instead, Microsoft is focusing on the platform, leaving third-party ISVs to focus on base functionality.

Another key change in the Microsoft relationship is that Citrix is now starting to engage with the Office group instead of focusing purely on the TS group. This allows them to treat the Office group within Microsoft just like any other software vendor. We’ll be seeing a lot more in this space, and in fact the Office group had a large presence at iForum this year.

What is Citrix’s strategy for Linux?
With regards to Citrix Secure Gateway, the current technology is based on Apache, so it’s future proofed to a large extent in that they could easily port it to any platform. From a business standpoint, they’re looking at customer preferences.

With regards to MetaFrame Presentation Server for Linux, Citrix looks at this quite often. They claim that Linux currently has less than 2% of the corporate desktop market, so the opportunity is not too large.

And even if they did build a product, how would they get it to market? Their current channel is a Windows channel. Look at how poorly MetaFrame for UNIX is doing.

Why am I so gossipy?
Someone posted this as a question. I thought it was pretty funny so I asked each of the Citrix executives I spoke with. Each of them laughed, and the common answer was something like they figured I was just trying to make a name for myself or sensationalize non events.

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This message was originally posted by Imre FÜLÖP on October 19, 2004
Correct me if I'm wrong: the CSG is based on Microsoft IIS not on Apache! So you have to put a MS server into your DMZ if you want to use it!
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on October 19, 2004
The question for the person who raised the question.
"Why are you still reading?"
Also:
1)We know that each vendor (including Citrix) is extremely biased toward their products and therefore does not give the whole truth. They want their products to be seen in the best light which is understandable. If you only hear from the manufacturer you miss out of truths. Brian is trying to level the playing field from a non-biased perspective so we-the users can make a more intelligent investment decision. ie - Citrix products compared to competitors.
2)We know Citrix reads the comments on this web site. Citrix will try to repair or improve on problems in their product and company that they may have had blind spots to before....so - keep sharpening Citrix with the truth. It will make Citrix a stronger company if Citrix responds to any negative perspectives.
my 2 cents.
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This message was originally posted by A Citrite on October 19, 2004
The current version of Secure Gateway (2.0) is entirely custom-developed by Citrix. It is not based on IIS or Apache, but it can act as a reverse web proxy, allowing SG 2.0 and IIS to coexist peacefully on the same server.

Secure Gateway is being rewritten from the ground up for version 3.0 to be based on Apache technology. This is the version that will ship with MPS4 next year.

Hope this helps.
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on October 20, 2004
Why doesn't Citrix take a serious approach to the China market?
They seem so out of step in their attitude in this respect.

Keep it gossipy!
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on October 25, 2004
For what they are worth...
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on October 25, 2004
Keep the Godd work up. You are not gossipy. We need articles with rich tech content.
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This message was originally posted by CMan on October 28, 2004
Try posting this in the Citrix public forums at http://support.citrix.com/forums/index.jspa as this is not a technical forum. Alternatively, try Brians forums on this site.
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on November 3, 2004
Linux's 2% share of the desktop market may seem small because it of the number "2". And if, the desktop market were only 1,000,000 desktops, then 20,000 desktops would be small number.

How large is the desktop market? A few hundred million? Suddenly 2% seems a little bit bigger. Analysts predict Linux desktop share at anywhere from 7-20% in the next 4-5 years. To put in perspective, Dell, the global PC leader, generating $45.4 billion in revenue for the last four quarters, recently achieved a desktop PC market share of only 16.8%.

Companies are no longer just "dabbling" in Linux. Vendors are starting to see Linux desktop orders approaching 10,000 units.

MetaFrame for Linux would accelerate Linux growth by allowing companies to try Linux before ditching their Win32 applications and/or deliver a heterogenous Linux/Windows environment.
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on November 16, 2004
I disagree with the statement that the Linux desktop market is low has any impact on the marketing of Metaframe for Linux. The great thing about offering Metaframe for Linux would be that the desktop would not have to run Linux to take advantage of Linux applications. Is this not a direction Citrix has taken? Run Windows applications from any device. Give me the ability to publish open source applications and I would show you a mixed environment with 32 bit Windows apps running on the same Windows PC as Linux Open Source applications. Think of the endless possibilities.
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This message was originally posted by an anonymous visitor on November 23, 2004
Want is the problem if I get and error that ICA file not found
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