Choosing the right thin client device: Linux, Windows, and the Software that Manages them

Even if you decide to go with thin client devices, the decisions about which thin client device you should use is almost as complex as your server architecture... Throw in the management software choices and you certainly have your work cut out for you!

Even if you decide to go with thin client devices, the decisions about which thin client device you should use is almost as complex as your server architecture... Throw in the management software choices and you certainly have your work cut out for you!

This white paper, "Choosing the right thin client devices, OS & management software," was written by 2X. I have certified it as part of my "no bull" program. (This is a program where I read vendors' papers and work with them to make sure that they don't contain any marketing hogwash or other standard vendor white paper crap. A paper that is certified, while not written by me, means that you can read it and know you're getting an objective and technically accurate story.)

This high-level white paper briefly discusses the various thin client device options, choices of operating system, and software options for managing them.


why2xthinclientserver.pdf

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This article comes from the company that bought out Terminal-Services.NET.

The article is very accurate, I would make a couple of notes:
PXE Booting can be problematic depending on how it is implemented. If the boot image is brought down each time then the boot process can be very slow. In addition depending on the Linux image the boot speed of the device can be much slower than CE or XP. If the image is downloaded to RAM then your devices cannot boot if there is a network or server problem, this means no offline functionality.
The CE Device Internet Explorer browser has extremely limited functionality, it may not be possible to use IE only content with the Windows CE IE browser. Many sites that are IE only use ActiveX controls written for x86 processors.
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Big named vendors charging extra for RDP??

I know for a fact that HP does not charge for essential functionality like RDP. That is ridiculous.

It doesn't even discuss one of the biggest disadvantages of using a Linux based thin client. That is, the RDP (rdesktop) client is not supported by Microsoft, and is dog-slow. Furthmore, customers who prefer to jump on the latest (Longhorn Terminal Server) will have to wait months, if not years, for the Linux community to reverse engineer the new RDP 6.0 client. And even then it would probably called version 5.99...

I'd expect a paper that is "endorsed" by Brian Madden to be more legitimate, comprehensive and research driven. This looks like it was typed up by a 2X rep on his 2-hour flight from a tradeshow.
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This article while a little light, did present the case for thin client options pretty objectively. I don't know why the previous commenter felt the need to bash the paper, nowhere was it suggested that HP in particular charged extra for RDP, the factual staement that "some" vendors do charge for RDP never mentioned HP.
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