How Remote Desktop Protocol Graphics and Media Remoting Really Works, from BriForum 2009

It's an urban legend that Microsoft's Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) shipped with Terminal Services has designed shortcomings and scalability limits. How much truth is in such a legend?

Presented by Benny Tritsch, CTO, Immidio, and Shawn Bass, Independent Consultant; Citrix Technology Professional

It’s an urban legend that Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) shipped with Terminal Services has designed shortcomings and scalability limits. How much truth is in such a legend? Are there ways to improve RDP performance for common user scenarios? And what is Microsoft doing to improve graphics remoting with Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2? How good is RDP in dealing with GDI, GDI+, DirectX, OpenGL, Windows Presentation Foundation, Flash, Silverlight, videos and animations?

Let’s face it -- there is a very simple goal. It’s all about improving the user experience. This means, it’s about getting faster and reducing latency when transmitting graphics and multimedia data over a network, no matter what their nature is and what the target device may be. In the best of all worlds, a user wouldn’t be able to differentiate between a local and a remote application when it comes to graphics and multimedia performance.

Join presentation virtualization geek and computer graphics expert Benny Tritsch in an in-depth look at how desktop, application and media remoting works. After attending his session, you will have no excuse for not knowing what RDP is good for.

 

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