Client Hypervisor: How Much Separation Needed Between You and Hardware?, video from BriForum 2010

Since the personal computer was introduced, layers of abstraction have been added, for one reason or another, between the hardware, programs, and users.

Presenter: Doug Coombs

Since the personal computer was introduced, layers of abstraction have been added, for one reason or another, between the hardware, programs, and users. In some cases abstraction was to make it easier and faster for programmers to create applications that provided rich content and better user experiences, while in other cases abstraction serves to eliminate, or at least limit, conflict and undesired interaction.

Moving forward we are being told that yet another layer of abstraction is needed in the form of a client-side hypervisor. This abstraction may serve to create new levels of simplicity by establishing standards by which applications and operating systems may address underlying hardware. It may provide newer and more powerful ways for IT organizations to manage and secure systems as well as establish new opportunities for multi-purpose work scenarios. It may also be that yet another level of abstraction simply consumes resources with little additional value than locking users into another abstraction stack similar to the Windows API. Is the client side hypervisor a marvel of simplicity and efficiency, or is it a degree of separation that we can do without?

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