A conversation with Citrix's Brian Nason and Sumit Dhawan about VDI and Project Trinity

Listen to this podcast

Project Trinity represents Citrix's entry into the virtual desktop infrastructure, or VDI space. Citrix has a unique opportunity here since they've been delivering applications to users for years, and VDI is really nothing more than delivering the desktop as an application.

Project Trinity represents Citrix's entry into the virtual desktop infrastructure, or VDI space. Citrix has a unique opportunity here since they've been delivering applications to users for years, and VDI is really nothing more than delivering the desktop as an application. In this conversation, we'll talk about Citrix's approach to VDI, the high-level architecture of Trinity, and how it fits into Citrix's larger application delivery strategy.

This conversation was with Sumit Dhawan (left), and Brian Nason (right).

This show will answer questions such as:

  • What is trinity specifically?
  • How does Citrix's DDI (dynamic desktop initiative) differ from the more standard term VDI?
  • What are the VDI/DDI benefits and how does Trinity deliver these?
  • What technologies make trinity happen?
  • How will trinity fit it to other solutions from other vendors?
  • What is Citrix's overall application strategy, and how does trinity fit in?
  • How Citrix will handle standard problems like printing, monitoring, management, etc.
  • What is the trinity architecture? How does it tie in the other backend Citrix architectures?
  • How will Citrix connect to an XP Workstation via ICA?

Join the conversation

3 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Please create a username to comment.

I was surpised that there was little or no discussion about how the recent acquisition of Ardence.  How does an OS streaming solution provider fit into this new and smorgasboard-like approach for delivering a Microsoft desktop (Thick or thin, real and/or virtual) , desktop-based apps (installed or virtual and delivered by PNAgent, Tarpon and/or Softricity) to desktops or thru server centric services.
 
This seems like a lot of connecting the dots, but it's hard to know who will control the dots and the rules for connecting.
 
 
Cancel
The Ardence acquisition happened after this interview, so that's why we didn't talk about it.
 
Brian
Cancel
I understand that the Citrix DDI model encompasses more than just VDI; flexibility to connect to physical, blade, and virtual desktops. However, I think Citrix is missing something critical in a true VDI solution: support for non Windows desktops. My shop is primarily Windows, but I must be able to also provide remote access to (virtual) Linux desktops. I'd hoped Trinity was going to be my VDI holy grail, but I guess not.

Here is what I'd hoped for:
Port a stripped down version of PS for Unix to run directly on the ESX host (minimal IMA service, support for an ICA session from remote user to the ESX server – not to the guest OS). This would allow virtual machines to be published (not sure if you'd use the term “published application” or “published desktop” in this case) using some management interface, such as a Citrix Console plugin to Virtual Center.

This model provides three primary advantages:
1)Support for non Windows guest OS (any guest OS supported by VMware).
2)Since the ICA connection exists at the hypervisor level, the guest OS is kept “pure” or “minimal”. There would be no requirement for loading Citrix software/services into the guest OS to support an ICA connection. This is an especially important in at least my environment, and I can only assume other administrators would benefit from this.
3)Network security & simplification: It would be possible to put a collection of guest (virtual) desktops on a virtual LAN without any connection to a physical LAN. The guest OS could be completely isolated from the WAN. In the DDI model, each WinXP instance requires a route from the Presentation Server.

I'm curious if anyone else sees the advantage/opportunity in this or if anyone (Brian) knows if Citrix as even considered such a model.
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchVirtualDesktop

SearchEnterpriseDesktop

SearchServerVirtualization

SearchVMware

Close